Siberia, a greater part of Russia, is much different from the European side of the country in geography, climate, and culture. It’s also the reason why Russia is considered to be a place with perpetual cold, ringing frosts, endless forests, bears, vodka, hunting, fishing, and stern Siberian muzhiks (men). Almost all is true for Siberia, except for the people — the people are friendly and welcoming. If you do not have the time to catch a 2 week train or an 8 hour flight from Moscow to explore Siberia, then step into #SibirSibir where you can at least get a glimpse of what Siberian cuisine has to offer.

Large, elegant and authentic, it’s located in the Azimut Hotel on Ulitsa Smolenskaya, opposite the Foreign Ministry building (one of the Stalin’ Seven Sisters). The place, although just recently opened, is already regularly packed with large parties and has a particularly masculine atmosphere of serious business negotiations and subsequent hearty talks over a decanter of ice-cold vodka. The interior described by the restaurant itself as “soviet realism” style includes samovars, kettles and teapots, quilted cushions and blankets, various pickles, and nesting boxes that are particular to the Siberian region. There is a wall decorated with felt boots and shawls and over 10 000 spoons hanging from the bar’s ceiling. Although this might sound kitch on paper, all these elements are interwoven into a very modern and trendy design.

 

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Публикация от Patricia Hoffrén (@patriciahoffren)

Публикация от JK (@lvsck)

The menu is based on traditional Siberian dishes. Many of the recipes were collected on trips to the remote villages of the Siberian taiga, where people still use old-fashioned cooking ‘technologies’. The hits include stroganina (frozen fish shavings), northern fish, pelmeni, shchi (cabbage soup), uha (fish soup), boiled ham, pies, pickles, fried salted fern, and numerous variations of the Russian layer salads like ‘Seld pod shuboy’ (herring undercoat).
For starters, try Olivier (Russian salad) with crayfish tails, red caviar and quail eggs (≈$13). Another worthy option of the menu is muksun, a must-try among Siberian fish. Here you can order it in stroganina (≈$15) or in a layer salad (≈$9) – undercoat, with vegetables and a drop of mayonnaise covered with petals of boiled beets). Don’t miss your chance to taste the shchi here – served in a small cast-iron bowler with finely chopped soft cabbage, tender meat and porcini mushrooms (≈$8). As for pelmeni (Russian dumplings), the choice of fillings is large. Most unusual are juicy veal and fern (≈$9), served in a clay pot accompanied with sour cream and vinegar – this is the way they eat the dish in Siberia. The wine list offers 1,200 types of wine, while a seperate room called the «Vodka» hall contains 740 varieties of Vodka and is constantly updated with new exclusive varieties.

 

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Публикация от Ольга Мелекесцева (@melekeska)

SibirSibir is a real gastronomic embassy of Siberia in Moscow and a place you’d go to plunge into the deep-seated Russian culture and traditions.

ADDRESS:

8 Ulitsa Smolenskaya

HOURS:

12 PM – Midnight

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